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SATURN DAILY
Cassini Sees Heat Below the Icy Surface of Enceladus
by Staff Writers
Pasadena CA (JPL) Mar 15, 2017


This enhanced-color Cassini view of southern latitudes on Enceladus features the bluish "tiger stripe" fractures that rip across the south polar region. For a larger version of this image please go here.

A new study in the journal Nature Astronomy reports that the south polar region of Saturn's icy moon Enceladus is warmer than expected just a few feet below its icy surface. This suggests that Enceladus' ocean of liquid water might be only a couple of miles beneath this region - closer to the surface than previously thought.

The excess heat is especially pronounced over three fractures that are not unlike the "tiger stripes" - prominent, actively venting fractures that slice across the pole - except that they don't appear to be active at the moment.

Seemingly dormant fractures lying above the moon's warm, underground sea point to the dynamic character of Enceladus' geology, suggesting the moon might have experienced several episodes of activity, in different places on its surface.

The finding agrees with the results of a 2016 study by a team independent of the Cassini mission that estimated the thickness of Enceladus' icy crust. The studies indicate an average depth for the ice shell of 11 to 14 miles (18 to 22 kilometers), with a thickness of less than 3 miles (5 kilometers) at the south pole.

"Finding temperatures near these three inactive fractures that are unexpectedly higher than those outside them adds to the intrigue of Enceladus," said Cassini Project Scientist Linda Spilker at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California.

"What is the warm underground ocean really like and could life have evolved there? These questions remain to be answered by future missions to this ocean world."

More information about this study is available from ESA, the European Space Agency here

SATURN DAILY
An Ice World...With an Ocean
Pasadena CA (JPL) Feb 22, 2017
On Feb. 17, 2005, NASA's Cassini spacecraft was making the first-ever close pass over Saturn's moon Enceladus as it worked through its detailed survey of the planet's icy satellites. Exciting, to be sure, just for the thrill of exploration. But then Cassini's magnetometer instrument noticed something odd. Since NASA's two Voyager spacecraft made their distant flybys of Enceladus about 20 years p ... read more

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