Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
  Saturn News  




Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















Map Of Titan With Labels

Titan by Cassini's Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS)
by Staff Writers
Pasadena CA (SPX) Jan 17, 2007
This global digital map of Titan was created using data taken by the Cassini spacecraft Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS). The data here consist of images taken using a filter centered at 938 nanometers, allowing researchers to examine albedo (or inherent brightness) variations across the surface of Titan.

Due to the scattering of light by Titan's dense atmosphere, no topographic shading is visible in these images. The map is an equidistant projection and has a scale of 2 kilometers (1.25 miles) per pixel. Equidistant projections preserve distances on a body, with some distortion of area and direction.

Actual resolution varies greatly across the map, with the best coverage (close to the map scale) near the center and edges of the map and the worst coverage on the trailing hemisphere (centered around 270 degrees west longitude).

Coverage should improve in some of the poorly covered areas starting in February 2007, when northern Belet, Adiri, and Dilmun will be imaged. Imaging coverage in the northern polar region, currently blank on this map, will improve over the next few years, as Titan approaches vernal equinox in August 2009.

The mean radius of Titan used for projection of this map is 2,575 kilometers (1,600 miles). Until a control network is created for Titan, the satellite is assumed to be spherical.

A clean version of the map, as well as a link to higher resolution versions, is available here.

The named features are designated by the International Astronomical Union. (A "facula" on Titan is a bright spot; a "macula" is a dark spot.)

This map demonstrates how our knowledge of Titan's surface has been vastly improved since Cassini arrived and began mapping the outsize moon. See Mapping Titan's Surface and Titan's Variety (with Grid) for earlier Cassini maps of Titan.

Related Links
Cassini at JPL
Cassini images
Explore The Ring World of Saturn and her moons
Explore The Ring World of Saturn and her moons
Jupiter and its Moons
The million outer planets of a star called Sol
News Flash at Mercury



Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News


Huygens Second Landing Anniversary
Paris, France (ESA) Jan 15, 2007
Two years ago, planetary scientists across the world watched as Europe and the US did something amazing. The Huygens descent module drifted down through the hazy atmosphere of Saturn's moon Titan, beaming its data back to Earth via the Cassini mothership. Today, Huygens's data are still continuing to surprise researchers. Titan holds a unique place in the Solar System. It is the only moon covered in a significant atmosphere.







  • Jupiter Encounter Begins For New Horizons Spacecraft On Route To Pluto
  • New Horizons in 2007

  • Opportunity Finds Another Meteorite
  • Spirit Continues To Test New Computer Smarts
  • NASA Funds Scripps Instrument For Probing For Life On Mars
  • MRO Conducts Details Survery Of Mars Pathfinder Landing Site And Surroundings







  • Strongest Winds On Earth Would Not Even Be A Breeze On These Planets
  • Gas Giants Jump Into Planet Formation Early

  • Japan Set To Cancel Delayed Moon Probe Mission
  • Copernicus And the Wild Goose Chase
  • British Plan For Solo Moon Missions Unlikely
  • Britain Considers Plans For Solo Moon Missions

  • Egypt Plans First Remote Sensing Satellite
  • Japanese Government Initiates Space-Borne Hyperspectral Payload Program
  • US Climate Satellites Imperiled By Low Federal Funding Say EO Scientists
  • Cartosat-2 Camera Tested

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright Space.TV Corporation. AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space.TV Corp on any Web page published or hosted by Space.TV Corp. Privacy Statement